Big Data, Medicine and You Creative Commons, Attribution alone (BY)
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Authors: Agnese Collino, Chiara Segré
Medicine
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The global bio-economy is generating new paradigm-shifting practices of knowledge co-production, such as collective innovation, large-scale global science and consortia ethics. In this module, we will give a glimpse of promises and challenges of Big Data in health-related fields. In some cases of Big Data collection and analysis, single citizens can contribute to science progress together with scientific community and even help to outline the future directions of science research. The classical walls between experts and common people are breaking down.
Technical requirements
  Computers, Internet Connection, Navigation Browsers installed on computer.
Knowledge acquisition gain
  Understanding the new concepts of participation in the process of building science knowledge: also single citizens can contribute to science progress together with scientific community and even help to outline the future directions of science research. The classical walls between experts and common people are breaking down. The pros and cons and the ethical and social implications will be discussed.

Workforce in Medicine

In the EU, jobs for health professionals - such as health practitioners, nursing professionals, and paramedicals - grew by 9% in the past five years. Jobs for health associate professionals - such as lab technicians and medical assistants - grew by 13%. Overall, they account for 6% of all jobs in the EU. As of 2016, around 13 million European health workers are employed. Most of them work in the health & social care sector. A small minority of health professionals works in other sectors - for example as consultants, professors, or public servants. In the next years, jobs for health professionals will increase by 5%, and jobs for health associates will increase by 10%.