Computers, mobile phones, tablets, nuclear power-plants, GPS satellites and many more devices. They all owe their existence to the revolution in physics that took part at the beginning of 20th century.

Through experiments run with real instruments, parameter setting and data collection, students will have a hands-on experience of many different physical phenomena, which will help them understand how physics regulates both nature and technology, and introduce them to potential working fields where physics skills are required.

Some of the topics of our experiments: gamma radiation attenuation, the photoeletrical effect, the Michelson Interferometer, Snell’s law, Black Body Radiation

RRI has been introduced in the physics course contents following

IDEA 2: RRI CHALLENGES THE METHODOLOGIES TO BE USED IN STEM EDUCATION

The methodologies used combine hands-on experience, learning via experiments and inquiry-based learning, which should increase engagement of students during the lesson/activity. Using learning via experiments methodology for example allow to actively involve the students in the execution, prediction, observation, and recording. They are discovering scientific concepts, create experimental models, understand the relationship between empirical studies and theory and thus learn how to conduct scientific studies.

IDEA 9: TRANSPARENCY AND OPENNESS SHOULD BE THE NEW CULTURES IN STEM EDUCATION

Experiments carried out by different teams of students are being shared and compared. For example, in the lesson on holography, each group of students will have to perform simple experiment entitled “CD/DVD disc as reflective diffraction grating”. Students determine distances between the recording tracks on CD/DVD disc. Their report will allow reconstructing details of the experiment and the comparison of results obtained by different groups. Sharing experimental results and honesty (including admitting to mistakes) are the basis of RRI. Open Access concepts will also be introduced based on this practical experience.

More information on RRI 10 Ideas

Physics contents are based on the following innovative educational tools

Learning via Experiments: Two types of experiments were used. The first are hands-on activities that can be prepared with low-cost components, and then constructed and subsequently conducted by students. For more complicated experiments that require more complicated hardware setup, expensive measurement devices or delicate components (like radioactive sources) we propose to use web-accessible remote laboratory (WARL). WARL significantly extends access for high schools students to advanced laboratory infrastructure typically hosted by universities. The remote laboratory allows performing measurements without having physical access to the equipment, often too complicated or too expensive to be available in secondary schools. From a user perspective, WARL requires only access to the Internet – a user needs just a modern web browser, which is almost always already installed on a computer connected to the Internet.

Inquiry Based Learning: we support the inquiry-based learning by providing a teacher or educator with a lesson script that includes questions for students together with answers she/he could use.

More information about Web-accessible remote laboratory (WARL)

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